Four American Moslem Ladies':
Racial and Gendered Insurgencies
in Early American Islam

by Sylvia Chan-Malik

[November 14, 2014]

6PM to 8PM

25 West 43rd Street, Room 1000
between 5th & 6th Avenues, Manhattan

 

 

This talk investigates the history of the first known photograph of Muslim women in the U.S. Taken in 1923, the photo features four African American Muslim women in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago—at the time known as the “Black Metropolis”—who had converted to Islam through the Ahmadiyya movement, a South Asia-based missionary sect. Through an analysis of the photo and the historical, social, and cultural circumstances surrounding it, Sylvia Chan-Malik narrates how Islam emerges as an affective and embodied experience in the early-20th century urban North, constituted by and through such women’s engagements and negotiations with forms of global citizenship, racial belonging, feminist desires, and Islamic practices, all of which, she argues, enable alternative definitions of “the racialization of Islam."

 

 

 


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Asian American / Asian Research Institute 2017

25 West 43rd Street, Room 1000, New York, NY 10036   
Phone: 212-869-0182 / 0187   
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